Timberwolf

Nate Cherrier grew up in the woods of a west coast island, working with timber and building with his father since before he can remember. The principles that Timberwolf stands on today—knowledge and quality, old world craftsmanship, detail and honesty— are a continuation of his father’s legacy.

Design - Blair Farrington

Design - Blair Farrington

Nate needed the freedom of creative control and design direction, so he started Timberwolf, a one-man carpentry operation. Nate called on Blair to create Timberwolf’s identity.

They started with the logo. The classic, gently arching font, combined with the crossed nail and hammer, perfectly represented the sense of simple, straightforward style central to Timberwolf’s philosophy.

The next component was the website. Just as a fine piece of carpentry combines function with elegance and tolerates no extra parts, Timberwolf’s site had to be both intuitive and sleek. Programmer Matt Hutchings obliged. Blair and Graeme documented some of Nate’s projects, in true Trading Co fashion risking life and limb. To get a shot encompassing the entirety of a multi-level backyard deck, their photographer balanced on the top rung of an A-frame ladder, which in turn balanced on the bed of a pick-up truck parked in the lot next door. Only the loving arms of Nate and Blair kept the set up standing, and with his arms stretched out above his head, fully extended, the photographer started shooting blind.

With the photos safely acquired, the only remaining part was the business card. It had to reflect Nate’s craft. It needed heft, weight and grain, needed to feel, in short, like a piece of raw timber. Alex at Classic Stationery printed each card in three parts: separate front and back panels and a center sheet of a darker-toned, thicker-grade paper for thickness and weight.

Bringing those separate pieces remained a dilemma. Blair experimented with the ancient method of wheat pasting. That was a gluey disaster. Then he called on Graeme’s photographic experience. He suggested dry mount tissue, a double-sided, heat-activated adhesive paper used to bond photos to mats for framing. Each card went first into a heat press and then through a cold bookbinding press. Then they were flipped and the process was repeated on the other side. One by one, Blair and Graeme painstakingly pressed 500 double-laminated, triple-layered cards.

A few days later, Nate called with bad news: the email address contained one wrong letter. After slamming his head against the table, Blair manned up and did penance, reprinting, assembling and double-pressing another 500 cards. (For the record, Blair proofreads now.)

The end result was well worth the hard work. The second batch of cards are so good that on a few occasions Nate has almost lost work because of them—some customers think he must be miles beyond their price range. But everybody wins: Nate impresses his clients, those clients get the work of a gifted craftsman, and Graeme and Blair rest well knowing they’ve created work worthy of Timberwolf.

Photography - Troy Moth

Photography - Troy Moth